Clean cooking and Indoor Air Pollution

Access to adequate and affordable energy products and services is a precondition for development. Household cooking in Ghana is mainly carried out by women who in general, work very hard (using mainly traditional cookstoves and solid biomass i.e. fuelwood and charcoal), under difficult conditions (heat and smoke) to feed their households or for small scale agro-processing that earns marginal incomes.

The over-dependence on fuelwood and charcoal contribute to deforestation and, therewith, to global warming, and poor air quality with associated health implications. Increasing LPG prices also affects the ability of bottom of the pyramid households to afford clean energy for cooking. A reduction in energy expenditure gives better spending options and increase in the efficient use of fuelwood contributes to combating deforestation, reduce exposure to excess smoke – thereby improving the air quality.

ISEES is committed to combating deforestation; increase incomes for women involved in household and institutional cooking, and improve their health condition. This can be achieved by reducing fuelwood consumption, by switching to non-fuelwood fuels (agricultural residues like shea butter shells, rice husk, saw dust, briquettes, etc.), or by adopting improved cookstoves (ICS).

ISEES promotes

1. Access to improved cookstoves for households through innovative mar20141127_170424ket based methods

2. Access to improved cookstoves for productive uses in agro-processing and food processing industry in Ghana

3. Design and promotion of improved cookstoves for households and institutions

4. Accessment of efficiency of improved cookstoves

5. Access to clean fuels for households and communities

6. Improved charcoal production methods

7. Conversion of biomass waste to clean fuels – briquettes, pellets

8. Development of gasifiers for cooking

9. Research into safety, access and distribution of LPG for cooking in households and institutions